Electric mini-diggers rolled out by electricity network operator

Electricity North West is the region’s first company to purchase state-of-the-art JCV electric mini-diggers which are quieter, zero emission and cheaper to run than diesel diggers.

Posted on 4 December 2019

 

Electricity North West is the region’s first company to purchase state-of-the-art JCV electric mini-diggers which are quieter, zero emission and cheaper to run than diesel diggers.

The two electric diggers will be used to install underground power cables following a successful six-month trial period.

Not only are the new diggers zero carbon at the point of use, they are five times quieter than diesel counterparts and will be 50 per cent cheaper to run over the first five years of use and 70 per cent cheaper to service. They can be fully-charged in two hours and used 24-hours-a-day by engineers.

The machines are the first of their kind to go into full production in the construction industry.  Steve Cox, engineering and technical director at Electricity North West, said: “Power cuts can happen at any time of the day and night and sometimes, we’re required to dig up roads and footpaths to repair faults. Using the new electricity diggers, which have reduced noise levels, means we can work into the night without impacting our customers.”

Zero carbon plan

The investment is as part of the network operator’s Leading the North West to Zero Carbon plan, which is investing £63.5 million over the next four years to drive down carbon emissions and help businesses and customers to do the same.

Steve Cox added: “In March we launched our Leading the North West to zero carbon plan, which demonstrates our commitment to be one of the businesses driving the region’s transition to a carbon neutral future.

“We’re looking closely at our own operations and how we can decarbonise them. Collectively, small changes can make big impacts and this shows what can be done now to reduce carbon without having a negative impact on customer service, performance or cost.”

 

 

 

 

 

Posted under Environmental Technologies and Renewable Energy and Construction on 4 December 2019