Company forces staff to go green!

The UK’s largest property company has launched a new energy saving scheme making sure that all its office staff get involved in reducing energy wastage.

Posted on 12 October 2009

The UK’s largest property company has launched a new energy saving scheme making sure that all its office staff get involved in reducing energy wastage.
 
The company, which leases 100 office buildings in London, has identified a list of energy-wasting office habits which it is encouraging tenants to commit to acting on, in its aim to create ‘ethical offices’.
 
Some of the measures have been initially unpopular, but in a short space of time staff have adjusted and shown positive responses.
 
One of the bad habits the company targeted is staff leaving computer monitors on standby overnight. Now, every night monitors are checked and a yellow card is placed on any monitor left on standby. A second offence leads to a red card and the culprit is summoned to a manager’s office for a verbal warning about their energy wastage!
 
Another measure has been to ban personal bins to reduce landfill and encourage recycling. Staff now collect waste at their desks, then once or twice a day take it to a recycling hub. This scheme was initially met with resistance but after two weeks staff had adjusted and the company involved has found its waste sent to landfill reduced by a third.
 
Other ideas have been to ask people working past 6pm to move to one area of the office, so that lighting and air conditioning systems can be turned off for the rest of the building, and in another building, energy consumption levels are displayed on a TV in its lift lobby, comparing day-to-day energy usage between offices and companies.
 
Another company has even trialled its own employee carbon trading scheme in which employees’ carbon emissions from home, commuting and even going on holiday are calculated and taken from a monthly allowance. Staff with small carbon footprints have been rewarded with bonuses of up to £100 per month, however other staff who have large carbon footprints, including a director who flew to South Africa for a holiday, have been fined the maximum of £100.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article6859432.ece http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article6832964.ece

Posted under General Interest on 12 October 2009