Could Liverpool become a tidal power world leader?

The Mersey Tidal Power project, a previously shelved initiative given new life by Liverpool City Region mayor Steve Rotherham, is heading into a new phase and could generate thousands of jobs.

Posted on 15 May 2019

 

The Mersey Tidal Power project, a previously shelved initiative given new life by Liverpool City Region mayor Steve Rotherham, is heading into a new phase and could generate thousands of jobs.

The project would see a barrage constructed across the River Mersey to capture tidal waters, which could then be used to power turbines to produce electricity.

The plan was originally suspended in 2011 because of its multi-billion price tag, but it was re-launched in 2017.

Unique opportunity

“The unique geography of the River Mersey and Liverpool Bay makes us one of the only places in the UK with the potential to generate plentiful, predictable, green tidal electricity,” explained mayor Steve Rotherham.

“Making this project a reality would create thousands of jobs for local people in the city region and that’s why we’re moving forward to the next stage, which is creating an outline business case to demonstrate the viability of a tidal power project.

“This is exactly the kind of transformational project that devolution and working together as a city region enables us to pursue… It means we can ensure that our children and young people, who might still be at school today, can be equipped with the skills they need to benefit from these jobs and to thrive in this exciting green industry.”

Huge energy potential

It is thought that tidal power on the River Mersey could generate up to four times the energy of all the wind turbines in place in Liverpool Bay - enough to power up to a million homes.

“As the whole world seeks to move beyond its dependence on carbon, we have an opportunity to build on our existing strengths in tidal research to develop a world-leading tidal power industry,” the mayor added.

“Our low carbon sector already generates £2 billion a year and supports 22,000 jobs across wind, solar and hydrogen energy.  With our vision and the right backing from government we can add tidal to the mix and become Britain’s Renewable Energy Coast.”

The next phase of the project involves the building of a business case over the next 12 months in collaboration with infrastructure firm Arup and other partners.

 

 

Posted under Environmental Technologies and Renewable Energy on 15 May 2019