Further funding for low carbon technologies

The Carbon Trust has opened a second round of funding for the development of low carbon technologies.

Posted on 31 July 2009

The Carbon Trust has opened a second round of funding for the development of low carbon technologies.

As part of its Applied Research Grant scheme, the Carbon Trust has made available grants of up to £500,000 for businesses and academia to support the development of, and commercialisation of, technologies that have the ability to reduce UK carbon emissions.

The grants offered by the Carbon Trust must be matched by 40% funding from the developer of the technology, with the project also having to meet the following criteria:

• Genuine innovation and the potential to contribute to substantial reductions in UK greenhouse gas emissions

• That the work is a well planned and builds on previous work in the area

• That the results of the work will allow a clear step forward on the path towards commercialisation

• That it represents good value for money

• Provides demonstrative benefit to the UK
 
To-date the Carbon Trust's Applied Research grant scheme has supported 184 projects from around 1800 applications and committed a total of £23m towards research worth around £54m. At least 65% of completed projects have, or are in the process of generating new patents, making commercial sales or receiving further investment into the development of the technology.

The scheme has provided grant funding to a wide range of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies including fuel cells, combined heat and power, bioenergy, solar power, low carbon building technologies, marine energy devices and more efficient industrial processes. A recent successful project has seen a team of engineers at the University of Liverpool receive a grant to develop a laser ignition system for cars that should significantly reduce exhaust emissions.

Posted under Environmental Technologies and Renewable Energy, Energy and Renewables and Environmental Technologies on 31 July 2009