Liverpool City Region needs to halve energy use by 2040

A landmark report has set out the pathway the Liverpool City Region needs to take to reach its goal of zero carbon by 2040 or sooner, which the city region’s mayor describes as a ‘moral duty’.

Posted on 27 January 2022

A landmark report has set out the pathway the Liverpool City Region needs to take to reach its goal of zero carbon by 2040 or sooner, which the city region’s mayor describes as a ‘moral duty’.

The Liverpool City Region Pathway to Net Zero concludes that the city region’s target is achievable with rapid, collective action and investment.

The report outlines that £45 billion of public and private investment will be required across green energy, transport, buildings and industry. This includes £15 billion for decarbonising energy supply, £12 billion for decarbonising homes and £5 billion for decarbonising workplaces and industry.

Energy

Switching from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources and low carbon hydrogen will play a key role. Clean energy schemes include plans to triple the size of wind power generation in Liverpool Bay, the Mersey Tidal Power project and the Hynet hydrogen initiative.

However, even with a rapid increase in renewable energy, total energy consumption will still need to be halved in less than 20 years through energy efficient technology and behaviour change to stay on track. Examples of key projects underway include Glass Futures in St Helens, which is leading the way in decarbonising the city region’s large glass industry.

Transport

The report shows that there is an urgent need for people to change the way they travel, with cars currently responsible for more than 65 per cent of Liverpool City Region’s transport emissions.

Public transport use will need to rise by 5 per cent a year by 2025, and 10 per cent a year by 2030. In total, £1 billion investment is needed in transport each year by 2025 to achieve net zero.

‘Race against time’

Perhaps the biggest headline in the report is that the drop in carbon emissions across the city region needs to be greatest in the next five years to remain on track.

“We are facing a race against time to save our planet from the threat of climate change,” said Steve Rotheram, mayor of the Liverpool City Region. “ will not happen overnight and will not be easy, but we all have our part to play – and there is a world of opportunity available to us by embracing that change.

“Our emerging strengths in wind, tidal and hydrogen can make us leaders in the green industrial revolution, creating tens of thousands of high-quality, high paying jobs for local people.”

 

Posted under General Interest on 27 January 2022